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A team consisting of doctors and nurses from the National University Hospital is treating a “patient” who was shot in a bar during the Simulation Showcase. Emergency teams from Australia, China and the Philippines are given various emergency situations to handle, for the participants to see if cultural differences made any difference to how emergency teams around the world function.

Learning how different emergency teams across the world function, picking up newfound knowledge on various aspects of healthcare simulation, exchanging views and experiences with peers, hearing and learning about Emergency Medicine benchmark practices from some of the best practitioners in the field. These were the highlights of the recent Asia-Pacific Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare conference hosted by the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine last month.

The conference brought together healthcare practitioners and educators from hospitals and medical schools across the Asia-Pacific. They sought and shared knowledge and expertise through a series of workshops and talks.

In its third run, the Asia-Pacific Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare conference drew 268 participants from more than 20 countries.

“We know that tremendous advances have been made in the use of simulation in health professional education. I think one of the questions is what more can we do to further improve its value in enhancing skills competencies, in driving real inter-professional training and of course, in increasing the focus on quality improvement and patient safety which is so important,” NUS President Tan Chorh Chuan said, at the Keynote Address on November 15.

The organisers also invited speakers from the United States to share their experiences with participants from the region, because healthcare simulation is in its “infancy” in this part of the world, said Associate Professor Suresh Pillai, organising chair of the event and Head of the Centre for Healthcare Simulation at NUS Medicine

“The technology in healthcare simulation is in leaps and bounds. How do we leverage on this technology to improve how we train our students, or even the way we train our practising doctors and nurses,” he said.

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Participants of a moulage workshop learn how to create mock injuries using food colourings and other materials for the purpose of emergency medicine training in hospitals and medical schools.

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Participants of the healthcare simulation conference watch how volunteers treat victims of a mock terrorist attack at an Emergency Preparedness Exercise.

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Participants of the healthcare simulation conference are treating a “patient” in a moulage workshop.
Through the workshop, they learn how to create mock injuries using food colourings and other
materials for the purpose of emergency medicine training in hospitals and medical schools.

 

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