Leveraging on AI for personalised cancer care

Professor Dean Ho and Assistant Professor Edward Chow, have created an artificial intelligence system which optimises drug selection and dosage to improve treatment of diseases.

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The science behind ageing muscle loss

Muscle loss may seem to be a common sign of ageing, but more can be done to help elderly retain their strength, said Ms Elisa Marie Crombie, graduate student from the Department of Physiology at NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine. Elisa was awarded a research grant to investigate the role of muscle stem cells in sarcopenia, a condition on the progressive loss of muscle strength and functionality that occurs with increasing age.

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A case against a moratorium on germline gene editing

Following the controversial case of the first gene-edited babies in China late last year, leading scientists and ethicists have called for a global moratorium to impose a temporary halt to the clinical uses of human germline editing. Dr Owen Schaefer from NUS Medicine's Centre for Biomedical Ethics shared the reasons for the call and the implications of the moratorium.

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Drinking water not the best way to cool body

A recent study by Research Associate Professor Jason Lee from NUS Medicine’s Department of Physiology found that drinking water is not the best way to lower body temperature. Instead, cooling before exercise, being heat acclimatised and having good aerobic fitness are all better ways to maximise performance in a hot environment.

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Not mere gut feeling: Blastocystis unmasked as clandestine killer of good bacteria

Blastocystis, a common single gut SCE is often regarded as a harmless commensal organism, peacefully co-existing with its bacterial neighbours. However, this could change with the publication of a new study from NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (NUS Medicine) which shows that a subtype of Blastocystis can actually harm its neighbours and its home in an insidious way.

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Mushrooms may reduce risk of cognitive decline

A team from the Department of Psychological Medicine and Department of Biochemistry at the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine has found that seniors who consume more than two standard portions of mushrooms weekly may have 50 per cent reduced odds of having mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

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Bridging the divide in pursuit of innovation

Three innovators from the field of biomedical research — BIGHEART Principal Investigators Asst Prof Catherine Ong from NUS Medicine, Asst Prof Shao Huilin and Asst Prof Toh Yi-Chin from NUS Biomedical Engineering — share their work and influence, and on a more personal note, the challenges faced by women in the scientific field.

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