Food allergies, begone!

The Food Oral Immunotherapy programme headed by Dr Soh Jian Yi has helped a young patient overcome an allergy to peanuts. Implemented in August 2015 in NUH, the programme first focused on peanuts, and it will soon be expanded to cashew, egg and pistachios in early 2017.

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NUS teams up against cancer

In light of World Cancer Day, NUS cancer researchers have been actively learning more about the disease and conducting groundbreaking work to come up with new treatment solutions.

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Muslim students’ outreach on healthcare

A group of NUS Medicine students hosted the 4th annual Muslim Healthcare Outreach Programme (MHOP) in NUS on 7 January 2017. A total of 120 secondary- and tertiary-level students participated, and the organisers shared their experiences and knowledge of Singapore’s healthcare.

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Doctors and dentists take up acupuncture

There is a growing interest in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) among practising doctors and dentists in recent years. They make up more than half of the 249 acupuncturists registered in Singapore. Assoc Prof Lau Tang Ching, Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Education at NUS Medicine, has been a registered acupuncturist since 2007.

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Pain management relief with acupuncture

NUH is one of the four public hospitals that offers acupuncture treatment to patients. Prof Lee Tat Leang said that the NUH acupuncture clinic receives more than 11,000 patient visits annually, and it is expecting to treat more patients this year.

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The wonders of medical research

Dr Michelle Poon shares her thoughts on how medical research has changed the lives of patients. Dr Poon specialises in leukemia treatments and she explains how some types of acute leukaemia require treatments that is the fruit of medical research.

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Standardised patients help with medical training

Part-time actors are now being engaged by medical schools to role-play as patients during medical training. These standardised patients (SPs) simulate patients and help mimic the symptoms and illnesses that medical students will eventually confront in their patients. 

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