A hug to a patient in need

Dr Yew Tong Wei, assistant professor at NUS Medicine’s Department of Medicine, recounted his experience with a 89-year-old patient Mr Lim.

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The Seventh International Meeting on Synthetic Biology (SB 7.0)

NUS Synthetic Biology for Clinical and Technological Innovation (SynCTI) is co-organising the Seventh International Meeting on Synthetic Biology (SB 7.0) from 13 to 16 June 2017 at the NUS University Cultural Centre. The conference will bring together a global community of synthetic biology practitioners to share, learn and debate on the latest efforts in the rapidly advancing field, and to build synergistic global partnerships.

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From one mother to another

A research team led by Dr Shefaly Shorey from the Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies at NUS Medicine has developed a novel mobile application to deliver postnatal educational programmes and to provide the much needed postnatal supportive care on the go. Findings from a pilot test showed that new parents who use the app experienced significantly better parenting outcomes.

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A life saved from a liver

Dr Alfred Kow, Assistant Dean of Education from NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, recounted the case of a patient who received a liver donation from a stranger back in 2013.

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Coping with the loss of a child

Dr Noreen Chan, Assistant Professor from Department of Medicine at NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, explains how caregivers can cope with death, and what palliative care can offer.

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Raw seafood may cause parasitic infection

In May 2017, Japanese and Western authorities warned the public about the rising number of parasitic infections caused by the Anisakis worm in raw seafood. Associate Professor Kevin Tan from Department of Microbiology and Immunology said the Anisakis worm infects crustaceans, fish, squid and marine mammals, and its larvae can be found in the muscle tissue of fish.

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Being lean and fat simultaneously

If you think being lean equates to being healthy, you may be wrong. Although many people in Singapore may look lean and have a normal body mass index (BMI), they may be “viscerally obese”, which means they have a high body fat content. This leads to a higher risk of developing metabolic diseases like diabetes.

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