Ear’s something new: Innate defence functions of the middle ear epithelium - NUS Medical Sciences Cluster

august, 2019

15aug4:00 pm5:00 pmEar’s something new: Innate defence functions of the middle ear epitheliumSpeaker: Prof. Colin Bingle (Professor of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Sheffield)

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Event Details

Date: 15 August 2019, Thursday

Time: 4:00PM – 5:00PM

Venue: Level 3, IMCB Seminar Room 3-46, Proteos, Biopolis


Speaker: Prof. Colin Bingle, Professor of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Sheffield

Title: Ear’s something new: Innate defence functions of the middle ear epithelium

Abstract

The middle ear epithelium is a key target tissue for otitis media (OM), a group of inflammatory diseases of the middle ear that are a leading cause of paediatric surgery and the prescription of antibiotics. Over 80% of children develop at least one incidence of OM by three years of age and it is estimated that, globally, over 100 million people have hearing loss due to OM. OM is caused by an unrestrained response by the middle ear epithelium to an exogenous trigger that results in the development of an abnormal mucociliary epithelium that produces characteristic exudates. My long-term interests have been focused on epithelial cell specific differentiation within the respiratory tract and mechanisms of host/pathogen interactions. As the middle ear epithelium is contiguous with the upper respiratory tract (through the eustachian tube) we have begun to study the biology of the middle ear. In this talk I will describe recent work we have undertaken on the middle ear to understand the cell biology and innate immune function of this epithelium. I will describe the development and characterisation of a novel in vitro model of the murine middle ear along with in vivo studies designed to better understand the pathophysiology of OM.

Biography

I am Professor of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology in the Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease at the University of Sheffield. My work employs molecular cell biology techniques to address questions relating to the regulation, structure, expression and function of epithelial genes from the respiratory tract in its widest sense. This work also involves studies of epithelial cell specific differentiation and understanding the role of distinct stem/basal cells in this process. Over the past few years my basic science research has moved into a more translational direction and I now working on the role of innate immune defence molecules in a number of diseases of the human respiratory tract as well as epithelial responses in infectious disease in the airways. I am also Editor-in-Chief of Biochemical Society Transactions, the reviews journal of the Biochemical Society.

Time

(Thursday) 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Location

Level 3, IMCB Seminar Room 3-46, Proteos, Biopolis

Organizer

A*Star IMCB

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