Stomach cancer trial treatment gives hope to more patients

A collaborative clinical trial has extended the lives of more patients compared to conventional treatments when the chemotherapy drug is directly injected into patients’ abdominal cavity.

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Fighting the stigma of mental illness

People with mental illness often face many prejudices. Professor Kua Ee Heok from the NUS Medicine’s Department of Psychological Medicine has been fighting to eliminate the stigma and discrimination faced by people suffering from mental health issues for the past few decades.

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Quick thinking? It’s all down to timing

Synaptic plasticity, which underlies learning and memory, involves the strengthening and weakening of synapses. This process is affected by the relative timing of spikes in electrical activity in the pre- and postsynaptic neurons. Researchers at NUS Medicine have now found that, when both spikes occur simultaneously (or within tens of milliseconds of each other), the synapses were strengthened for up to 4 hours. These findings could impact research in conditions with impaired learning and memory.

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A ray of hope for organ transplant patients

A collaborative study led by Prof A. Vathsala and Assoc Prof Paul MacAry on organ recipient immune system interaction with transplanted organ offers new insights into chronic organ rejection.

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Early detection of gastric cancer with blood test

Clinicians currently perform diagnosis of gastric cancer by doing an invasive procedure called endoscopy, and it is costly. The Singapore Gastric Cancer Consortium led by Assoc Prof Yeoh Khay Guan is now developing a simple blood test that can detect gastric cancer by measuring microRNA levels in blood, without performing endoscopy.

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Leveraging on AI for personalised cancer care

Professor Dean Ho and Assistant Professor Edward Chow, have created an artificial intelligence system which optimises drug selection and dosage to improve treatment of diseases.

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The science behind ageing muscle loss

Muscle loss may seem to be a common sign of ageing, but more can be done to help elderly retain their strength, said Ms Elisa Marie Crombie, graduate student from the Department of Physiology at NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine. Elisa was awarded a research grant to investigate the role of muscle stem cells in sarcopenia, a condition on the progressive loss of muscle strength and functionality that occurs with increasing age.

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