NUS Medicine researcher wins prestigious Gabbay award for groundbreaking CAR-T cell immunotherapy work

NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine’s Professor Dario Campana is one of two researchers conferred an international award for groundbreaking work in immunotherapy. The Jacob and Louise Gabbay Award in Biotechnology and Medicine recognises scientists in academia, medicine or industry whose work hold outstanding scientific content and significant practical consequences in the biomedical sciences. Prof Campana is one of the pioneers of CAR-T cell therapy, which has been recently used successfully to treat children and adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) here in Singapore at the National University Hospital (NUH).

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NUS medical students get exposure to mass casualty incidents

Medical students at the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine can now put their knowledge and skills to the test as members of a medical emergency response team operating in various mass casualty incident scenarios, through a virtually simulated environment. This is made possible through the School’s introduction of the Virtual Interactive Simulation Environment (VISE) system at the Centre for Healthcare Simulation.

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Quick thinking? It’s all down to timing

Synaptic plasticity, which underlies learning and memory, involves the strengthening and weakening of synapses. This process is affected by the relative timing of spikes in electrical activity in the pre- and postsynaptic neurons. Researchers at NUS Medicine have now found that, when both spikes occur simultaneously (or within tens of milliseconds of each other), the synapses were strengthened for up to 4 hours. These findings could impact research in conditions with impaired learning and memory.

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Not mere gut feeling: Blastocystis unmasked as clandestine killer of good bacteria

Blastocystis, a common single gut SCE is often regarded as a harmless commensal organism, peacefully co-existing with its bacterial neighbours. However, this could change with the publication of a new study from NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (NUS Medicine) which shows that a subtype of Blastocystis can actually harm its neighbours and its home in an insidious way.

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NUS scientists find a key to unlocking mystery of Lou Gehrig’s Disease

For the longest time, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis was thought to be a purely motor neuron disease (MND), in which nerve cells controlling our body movements gradually break down and die. Now, a five-year study by NUS Medicine's Department of Physiology has revealed that neighbouring cells known as oligodendrocytes also participate in the disease process.  This will help scientists better understand ALS, leading to the possibility of an eventual treatment for the condition.

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A potential new treatment method for melanoma skin cancer

Researchers at the National University of Singapore’s Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (NUS Medicine) have discovered a small man-made molecule that can activate a receptor in the cell membrane to “kill” tumour cells in melanoma skin cancer, controlling the growth of the cancer cells. This process is activated once the molecule is injected into the body. The small molecule NSC49652 will bind to a death receptor p75NTR in the cell membrane, starting a process which then causes melanoma cells to die.

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Making hearing checks easy and accessible for seniors

An NUS-led research initiative is under way to develop and trial accessible and cost-effective hearing services for the elderly in Singapore. It is part of a three-year project which seeks to address the increasing need for hearing care services of the growing elderly population.

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